Videos http://www.massage-stlouis.com/category/tags/videos en The first principle is not to fool yourself . . . http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/first-principle-not-fool-yourself <span>The first principle is not to fool yourself . . . </span> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden clearfix"> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/category/tags/videos" hreflang="en">Videos</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/reflexology" hreflang="en">Reflexology</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/evidence-based-massage" hreflang="en">Evidence Based Massage</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/energy-work" hreflang="en">Energy Work</a></li> </ul> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/alice" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alice</span></span> <span>Mon, 03/16/2015 - 9:45pm</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>In 1974, Richard Feynman delivered the commencement address at Caltech. The speech has endured and is often referred to as the "Cargo Cult Science" speech.</p> <p>I love this speech. It's about intellectual honesty and integrity. It's about how not to fool yourself.</p> <p>I've referred to it many times and read it over and over. If I were fond of memorizing, which I am not, I would memorize sections of it. I've thought of having, "The first principle is not to fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool," painted on my wall so I'd see it every day.</p> <p>At the end, he wishes for the students that they always have the freedom to maintain the kind of integrity he describes. I would also wish, for myself and my fellow massage therapists, that we always strive to maintain the high standards of integrity he describes.</p> <p>I've decided to reproduce his famous speech here because I think the ideas it expresses are so important. As an emerging profession, massage therapy is at a crossroads. In the past, we were taught mostly from tradition, often by teachers who were not particularly science literate. Some of what we were taught were outdated ideas once thought to be true; other things were based more on mysticism, superstition, and distorted, inaccurate ideas about how the body worked.</p> <p>I don't fault any of my teachers. One cannot be blamed for what one does not know (and doesn't know they don't know!) and they meant well. However, we now have a better understanding of how the body works and it's up to us to carry our profession forward by giving students accurate information and by updating our own thinking to be compatible with what is known in science.</p> <p>Some massage therapists think that science takes all the wonder out of massage. To them, I ask: when you look up at the night sky and contemplate that the stars are giant balls of flaming gases millions of miles away, does that make them less interesting? I can hardly wrap my small mind around such an expansive idea! When I think of the workings of the brain, and the nervous system, and how it translates my touch into something wonderful and relaxing and even pain relieving for the client on my table, this does not diminish the experience for me but, in fact, enhances it. Science has not only increased my knowledge but deepened my sense of wonder.</p> <p>Science informs me and then I get to decide, with the client's permission, how to put that to work. That is the art of massage.</p> <p>If you have never read Richard Feynman's speech, I hope you will enjoy it as much as I do. And if you've read it before, I hope you will enjoy it again. Pass it on to a friend.</p> <p> </p> <h1>Cargo Cult Science</h1> <h2>By Richard Feynman</h2> <p>From a Caltech commencement address given in 1974<br /> Also in <em>Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!</em></p> <p>During the Middle Ages there were all kinds of crazy ideas, such as that a piece of of rhinoceros horn would increase potency. Then a method was discovered for separating the ideas--which was to try one to see if it worked, and if it didn't work, to eliminate it. This method became organized, of course, into science. And it developed very well, so that we are now in the scientific age. It is such a scientific age, in fact, that we have difficulty in understanding how witch doctors could ever have existed, when nothing that they proposed ever really worked--or very little of it did.</p> <p>But even today I meet lots of people who sooner or later get me into a conversation about UFO's, or astrology, or some form of mysticism, expanded consciousness, new types of awareness, ESP, and so forth. And I've concluded that it's not a scientific world.</p> <p>Most people believe so many wonderful things that I decided to investigate why they did. And what has been referred to as my curiosity for investigation has landed me in a difficulty where I found so much junk that I'm overwhelmed. First I started out by investigating various ideas of mysticism and mystic experiences. I went into isolation tanks and got many hours of hallucinations, so I know something about that. Then I went to Esalen, which is a hotbed of this kind of thought (it's a wonderful place; you should go visit there). Then I became overwhelmed. I didn't realize how MUCH there was.</p> <p>At Esalen there are some large baths fed by hot springs situated on a ledge about thirty feet above the ocean. One of my most pleasurable experiences has been to sit in one of those baths and watch the waves crashing onto the rocky slope below, to gaze into the clear blue sky above, and to study a beautiful nude as she quietly appears and settles into the bath with me.</p> <p>One time I sat down in a bath where there was a beautiful girl sitting with a guy who didn't seem to know her. Right away I began thinking, "Gee! How am I gonna get started talking to this beautiful nude woman?"</p> <p>I'm trying to figure out what to say, when the guy says to her, "I'm, uh, studying massage. Could I practice on you?" "Sure," she says. They get out of the bath and she lies down on a massage table nearby. I think to myself, "What a nifty line! I can never think of anything like that!" He starts to rub her big toe. "I think I feel it," he says. "I feel a kind of dent--is that the pituitary?" I blurt out, "You're a helluva long way from the pituitary, man!" They looked at me, horrified--I had blown my cover--and said, "It's reflexology!" I quickly closed my eyes and appeared to be meditating.</p> <p>That's just an example of the kind of things that overwhelm me. I also looked into extrasensory perception, and PSI phenomena, and the latest craze there was Uri Geller, a man who is supposed to be able to bend keys by rubbing them with his finger. So I went to his hotel room, on his invitation, to see a demonstration of both mindreading and bending keys. He didn't do any mindreading that succeeded; nobody can read my mind, I guess. And my boy held a key and Geller rubbed it, and nothing happened. Then he told us it works better under water, and so you can picture all of us standing in the bathroom with the water turned on and the key under it, and him rubbing the key with his finger. Nothing happened. So I was unable to investigate that phenomenon.</p> <p>But then I began to think, what else is there that we believe? (And I thought then about the witch doctors, and how easy it would have been to check on them by noticing that nothing really worked.) So I found things that even more people believe, such as that we have some knowledge of how to educate. There are big schools of reading methods and mathematics methods, and so forth, but if you notice, you'll see the reading scores keep going down--or hardly going up--in spite of the fact that we continually use these same people to improve the methods. There's a witch doctor remedy that doesn't work. It ought to be looked into; how do they know that their method should work? Another example is how to treat criminals. We obviously have made no progress--lots of theory, but no progress--in decreasing the amount of crime by the method that we use to handle criminals.</p> <p>Yet these things are said to be scientific. We study them. And I think ordinary people with commonsense ideas are intimidated by this pseudoscience. A teacher who has some good idea of how to teach her children to read is forced by the school system to do it some other way--or is even fooled by the school system into thinking that her method is not necessarily a good one. Or a parent of bad boys, after disciplining them in one way or another, feels guilty for the rest of her life because she didn't do "the right thing," according to the experts.</p> <p><strong><em>So we really ought to look into theories that don't work, and science that isn't science.</em></strong></p> <p>I think the educational and psychological studies I mentioned are examples of what I would like to call cargo cult science. In the South Seas there is a cargo cult of people. During the war they saw airplanes with lots of good materials, and they want the same thing to happen now. So they've arranged to make things like runways, to put fires along the sides of the runways, to make a wooden hut for a man to sit in, with two wooden pieces on his head to headphones and bars of bamboo sticking out like antennas--he's the controller--and they wait for the airplanes to land. They're doing everything right. The form is perfect. It looks exactly the way it looked before. But it doesn't work. No airplanes land. So I call these things cargo cult science, because they follow all the apparent precepts and forms of scientific investigation, but they're missing something essential, because the planes don't land.</p> <p>Now it behooves me, of course, to tell you what they're missing. But it would be just about as difficult to explain to the South Sea islanders how they have to arrange things so that they get some wealth in their system. It is not something simple like telling them how to improve the shapes of the earphones. But there is one feature I notice that is generally missing in cargo cult science. That is the idea that we all hope you have learned in studying science in school--we never say explicitly what this is, but just hope that you catch on by all the examples of scientific investigation. It is interesting, therefore, to bring it out now and speak of it explicitly. <strong><em>It's a kind of scientific integrity, a principle of scientific thought that corresponds to a kind of utter honesty--a kind of leaning over backwards. For example, if you're doing an experiment, you should report everything that you think might make it invalid--not only what you think is right about it: other causes that could possibly explain your results; and things you thought of that you've eliminated by some other experiment, and how they worked--to make sure the other fellow can tell they have been eliminated.</em></strong></p> <p>Details that could throw doubt on your interpretation must be given, if you know them. You must do the best you can--if you know anything at all wrong, or possibly wrong--to explain it. If you make a theory, for example, and advertise it, or put it out, then you must also put down all the facts that disagree with it, as well as those that agree with it. There is also a more subtle problem. When you have put a lot of ideas together to make an elaborate theory, you want to make sure, when explaining what it fits, that those things it fits are not just the things that gave you the idea for the theory; but that the finished theory makes something else come out right, in addition.</p> <p><strong><em>In summary, the idea is to give all of the information to help others to judge the value of your contribution; not just the information that leads to judgement in one particular direction or another.</em></strong></p> <p>The easiest way to explain this idea is to contrast it, for example, with advertising. Last night I heard that Wesson oil doesn't soak through food. Well, that's true. It's not dishonest; but the thing I'm talking about is not just a matter of not being dishonest; it's a matter of scientific integrity, which is another level. The fact that should be added to that advertising statement is that no oils soak through food, if operated at a certain temperature. If operated at another temperature, they all will--including Wesson oil. So it's the implication which has been conveyed, not the fact, which is true, and the difference is what we have to deal with.</p> <p><strong><em>We've learned from experience that the truth will come out.</em></strong> Other experimenters will repeat your experiment and find out whether you were wrong or right. Nature's phenomena will agree or they'll disagree with your theory. And, although you may gain some temporary fame and excitement, you will not gain a good reputation as a scientist if you haven't tried to be very careful in this kind of work. And it's this type of integrity, this kind of care not to fool yourself, that is missing to a large extent in much of the research in cargo cult science.</p> <p>A great deal of their difficulty is, of course, the difficulty of the subject and the inapplicability of the scientific method to the subject. Nevertheless, it should be remarked that this is not the only difficulty. That's why the planes don't land--but they don't land.</p> <p>We have learned a lot from experience about how to handle some of the ways we fool ourselves. One example: Millikan measured the charge on an electron by an experiment with falling oil drops, and got an answer which we now know not to be quite right. It's a little bit off because he had the incorrect value for the viscosity of air. It's interesting to look at the history of measurements of the charge of an electron, after Millikan. If you plot them as a function of time, you find that one is a little bit bigger than Millikan's, and the next one's a little bit bigger than that, and the next one's a little bit bigger than that, until finally they settle down to a number which is higher.</p> <p>Why didn't they discover the new number was higher right away? It's a thing that scientists are ashamed of--this history--because it's apparent that people did things like this: When they got a number that was too high above Millikan's, they thought something must be wrong--and they would look for and find a reason why something might be wrong. When they got a number close to Millikan's value they didn't look so hard. And so they eliminated the numbers that were too far off, and did other things like that. We've learned those tricks nowadays, and now we don't have that kind of a disease.</p> <p>But this long history of learning how to not fool ourselves--of having utter scientific integrity--is, I'm sorry to say, something that we haven't specifically included in any particular course that I know of. We just hope you've caught on by osmosis</p> <h3>The first principle is that you must not fool yourself--and you are the easiest person to fool. So you have to be very careful about that. After you've not fooled yourself, it's easy not to fool other scientists. You just have to be honest in a conventional way after that.</h3> <p>I would like to add something that's not essential to the science, but something I kind of believe, which is that you should not fool the layman when you're talking as a scientist. I am not trying to tell you what to do about cheating on your wife, or fooling your girlfriend, or something like that, when you're not trying to be a scientist, but just trying to be an ordinary human being. We'll leave those problems up to you and your rabbi. <strong><em>I'm talking about a specific, extra type of integrity that is not lying, but bending over backwards to show how you're maybe wrong, that you ought to have when acting as a scientist. And this is our responsibility as scientists, certainly to other scientists, and I think to laymen.</em></strong></p> <p>For example, I was a little surprised when I was talking to a friend who was going to go on the radio. He does work on cosmology and astronomy, and he wondered how he would explain what the applications of his work were. "Well," I said, "there aren't any." He said, "Yes, but then we won't get support for more research of this kind." I think that's kind of dishonest. If you're representing yourself as a scientist, then you should explain to the layman what you're doing-- and if they don't support you under those circumstances, then that's their decision.</p> <p>One example of the principle is this: <strong><em>If you've made up your mind to test a theory, or you want to explain some idea, you should always decide to publish it whichever way it comes out. If we only publish results of a certain kind, we can make the argument look good. We must publish BOTH kinds of results.</em></strong></p> <p>I say that's also important in giving certain types of government advice. Supposing a senator asked you for advice about whether drilling a hole should be done in his state; and you decide it would be better in some other state. If you don't publish such a result, it seems to me you're not giving scientific advice. You're being used. If your answer happens to come out in the direction the government or the politicians like, they can use it as an argument in their favor; if it comes out the other way, they don't publish at all. That's not giving scientific advice.</p> <p>Other kinds of errors are more characteristic of poor science. When I was at Cornell, I often talked to the people in the psychology department. One of the students told me she wanted to do an experiment that went something like this--it had been found by others that under certain circumstances, X, rats did something, A. She was curious as to whether, if she changed the circumstances to Y, they would still do A. So her proposal was to do the experiment under circumstances Y and see if they still did A.</p> <p>I explained to her that it was necessary first to repeat in her laboratory the experiment of the other person--to do it under condition X to see if she could also get result A, and then change to Y and see if A changed. Then she would know the the real difference was the thing she thought she had under control.</p> <p>She was very delighted with this new idea, and went to her professor. And his reply was, no, you cannot do that, because the experiment has already been done and you would be wasting time. This was in about 1947 or so, and it seems to have been the general policy then to not try to repeat psychological experiments, but only to change the conditions and see what happened.</p> <p>Nowadays, there's a certain danger of the same thing happening, even in the famous field of physics. I was shocked to hear of an experiment being done at the big accelerator at the National Accelerator Laboratory, where a person used deuterium. In order to compare his heavy hydrogen results to what might happen with light hydrogen, he had to use data from someone else's experiment on light hydrogen, which was done on different apparatus. When asked why, he said it was because he couldn't get time on the program (because there's so little time and it's such expensive apparatus) to do the experiment with light hydrogen on this apparatus because there wouldn't be any new result. And so the men in charge of programs at NAL are so anxious for new results, in order to get more money to keep the thing going for public relations purposes, they are destroying--possibly--the value of the experiments themselves, which is the whole purpose of the thing. It is often hard for the experimenters there to complete their work as their scientific integrity demands.</p> <p>All experiments in psychology are not of this type, however. For example, there have been many experiments running rats through all kinds of mazes, and so on--with little clear result. But in 1937 a man named Young did a very interesting one. He had a long corridor with doors all along one side where the rats came in, and doors along the other side where the food was. He wanted to see if he could train the rats to go in at the third door down from wherever he started them off. No. The rats went immediately to the door where the food had been the time before.</p> <p>The question was, how did the rats know, because the corridor was so beautifully built and so uniform, that this was the same door as before? Obviously there was something about the door that was different from the other doors. So he painted the doors very carefully, arranging the textures on the faces of the doors exactly the same. Still the rats could tell. Then he thought maybe the rats were smelling the food, so he used chemicals to change the smell after each run. Still the rats could tell. Then he realized the rats might be able to tell by seeing the lights and the arrangement in the laboratory like any commonsense person. So he covered the corridor, and still the rats could tell.</p> <p>He finally found that they could tell by the way the floor sounded when they ran over it. And he could only fix that by putting his corridor in sand. So he covered one after another of all possible clues and finally was able to fool the rats so that they had to learn to go in the third door. If he relaxed any of his conditions, the rats could tell.</p> <p>Now, from a scientific standpoint, that is an A-number-one experiment. <em><strong>That is the experiment that makes rat-running experiments sensible, because it uncovers that clues that the rat is really using-- not what you think it's using. And that is the experiment that tells exactly what conditions you have to use in order to be careful and control everything in an experiment with rat-running.</strong></em></p> <p>I looked up the subsequent history of this research. The next experiment, and the one after that, never referred to Mr. Young. They never used any of his criteria of putting the corridor on sand, or being very careful. They just went right on running the rats in the same old way, and paid no attention to the great discoveries of Mr. Young, and his papers are not referred to, because he didn't discover anything about the rats. In fact, he discovered all the things you have to do to discover something about rats. But not paying attention to experiments like that is a characteristic example of cargo cult science.</p> <p>Another example is the ESP experiments of Mr. Rhine, and other people. As various people have made criticisms--and they themselves have made criticisms of their own experiements--they improve the techniques so that the effects are smaller, and smaller, and smaller until they gradually disappear. All the para-psychologists are looking for some experiment that can be repeated--that you can do again and get the same effect--statistically, even. They run a million rats--no, it's people this time--they do a lot of things are get a certain statistical effect. Next time they try it they don't get it any more. And now you find a man saying that is is an irrelevant demand to expect a repeatable experiment. This is science?</p> <p>This man also speaks about a new institution, in a talk in which he was resigning as Director of the Institute of Parapsychology. And, in telling people what to do next, he says that one of things they have to do is be sure the only train students who have shown their ability to get PSI results to an acceptable extent--not to waste their time on those ambitious and interested students who get only chance results.<strong><em> It is very dangerous to have such a policy in teaching--to teach students only how to get certain results, rather than how to do an experiment with scientific integrity.</em></strong></p> <h3><em>So I have just one wish for you--the good luck to be somewhere where you are free to maintain the kind of integrity I have described, and where you do not feel forced by a need to maintain your position in the organization, or financial support, or so on, to lose your integrity. May you have that freedom.</em></h3> <hr /><hr /><p>If you liked that, you might enjoy this documentary:</p> <p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bgaw9qe7DEE">Richard Feynman - The Pleasure of Finding Things Out</a></p> <p> </p> <p> </p> </div> <section class="comments" > </section> Tue, 17 Mar 2015 01:45:15 +0000 Alice 251 at http://www.massage-stlouis.com Notes from Skepticamp, 9/14/13: A Skeptical Look at Back Pain http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/notes-skepticamp-91413-skeptical-look-back-pain <span>Notes from Skepticamp, 9/14/13: A Skeptical Look at Back Pain</span> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden clearfix"> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/category/tags/videos" hreflang="en">Videos</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/pain-relief" hreflang="en">Pain relief</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/pain-management" hreflang="en">Pain Management</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/community" hreflang="en">Community</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/back-pain" hreflang="en">Back pain</a></li> </ul> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/alice" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alice</span></span> <span>Thu, 09/12/2013 - 3:01pm</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>These are notes from a presentation given at the Skeptical Society of St. Louis Skepticamp on Saturday, September 14, 2013. Links to some of the resources and studies mentioned during the presentation, as well as additional links that may be of interest, are provided for those who would like to look at them.<o p=""></o></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p=""> </o></p> <h3>A Skeptical Look at Back Pain: Notes from Skepticamp 2013</h3> <p><o p=""></o></p> <p>In 1995 I was working at St. Mary’s hospital when I heard about this study which examined 98 people who had no low back pain (LBP) and found that a large percentage had herniated discs. ("asymptomatic" means without symptoms i.e. no pain)</p> <p><o p=""> </o><a href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199407143310201">http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199407143310201</a></p> <p>            98 asymptomatic individuals ages 20 – 80</p> <p>            36% normal discs at all levels</p> <p>            52% bulging disc at at least 1 level</p> <p>            38% abnormal at more than one level</p> <p>            Findings similar in men &amp; women</p> <p>            Abnormalities increased with age</p> <p>            Images – 21 yr. old man &amp; 24 yr. old woman</p> <p><o p=""> </o></p> <p><em><strong>I thought this would rock the world of pain management. It didn’t.</strong></em></p> <p><o p=""> </o></p> <p>An earlier study in 1989 study looked at 67 asymptomatic individuals.</p> <p>            31% had disc abnormalities or abnormal spinal canal</p> <p>            7 year follow-up – 50 responded, 31 had repeat MRIs</p> <p>            MRI not predictive of low back pain</p> <p><a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11568190">http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11568190</a></p> <p><o p=""> </o></p> <p>More recently: March 14, 2013 New England Journal of Medicine<br /><a href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1209250">http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1209250</a></p> <p><o p="">Patients at a pain clinic were examined before treatment and after one year. There was no correlation between the presence of herniated discs and pain.</o> </p> <p><o p=""> </o></p> <p><o p=""></o>There is no change in the trend of rising cost of treating LBP in Western countries</p> <p>Early MRI may actually lead to worse outcomes:</p> <p><a href="http://www.bodyinmind.org/spinal-mri-and-back-pain/">http://www.bodyinmind.org/spinal-mri-and-back-pain/</a></p> <p><o p=""> </o>           </p> <p>One reason may be belief reinforcement</p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3663473/?report=classic">https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3663473/?report=classic</a></p> <p>            </p> <p>Pain education is not a magic bullet but can reduce pain and even prevent pain. </p> <p><a href="http://www.bboyscience.com/pain-education/">Learning Pain Science can Relieve and Prevent Pain</a></p> <p><o p=""> </o></p> <p><em><strong>What can you do?</strong></em></p> <p>Educate yourself about pain. Lorimer Moseley is a pain science missionary. He is very funny and he is brilliant. Watch his videos!</p> <p><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gwd-wLdIHjs">15 Minute TED Talk on Why Pain Hurts.</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYoGXv22G3k">25 Minute talk on how pain works</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3NmTE-fJSo">45 Minute talk to professionals about the biology of pain</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.bodyinmind.org/popping-your-disc-when-elegant-simplifications-are-catastrophic-trivialisations/">Article on “the popping spine” with link to brief video, plus a video on pain on that page.</a></p> <p><o p=""> </o></p> <p>The book <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Explain-Pain-David-Butler/dp/097509100X">Explain Pain</a> by Butler and Moseley is a must-read for anyone with pain or anyone who works with people in pain. If you don’t want to buy it, your library can get it on the interlibrary loan system. Better yet, request that your library get it in their system.</p> <p>Use <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/using-graded-exposure-manage-chronic-pain">graded exposure</a> to cultivate successful movement. Motion is lotion!</p> <p>Gentle manual therapy can help your body to relax and turn down the volume on pain. </p> <p><o p=""> </o></p> <p>Don’t panic! Most back pain is self-limiting.</p> <p><o p=""> </o></p> <p><o p=""> </o></p> <p>Recommended reading for people who like geeky academic papers and studies on pain.</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.360nmt.com/pdfs/pain_and_the_neuromatrix_in_the_brain.pdf">Pain and the Neuromatrix in the Brain</a></em> by Melzack</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.sigurdmikkelsen.no/admin/dokumenter/JBMT%20debate%20-%202011%20-%20Is%20a%20postural-structural-biomechanical%20model,%20within%20manual%20therapies,%20viable%3F.pdf">The fall of the postural/structural/biomechanical model in manual and physical therapies</a></em> by Lederman</p> <p>Very detailed paper titled, simply, “<em>Pain</em>,” by Melzack and Katz. Not easy reading but describes the history and evolution of recent pain science – where we’ve been, where we are now.</p> <p><a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/wcs.1201/full">http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/wcs.1201/full</a></p> <p> </p> <p><strong><em>Thanks to the St. Louis Skeptical Society for allowing me to speak at Skepticamp!</em></strong></p> <p><o p=""> </o></p> <p><!--EndFragment--></p> <p> </p> <p><!--[if gte mso 9]&gt;<xml> <o documentproperties> <o template>Normal.dotm</o> <o revision>0</o> <o totaltime>0</o> <o pages>1</o> <o words>6</o> <o characters>37</o> <o company>Desert Dog Technology, Inc.</o> <o lines>1</o> <o paragraphs>1</o> <o characterswithspaces>45</o> <o version>12.0</o> </o> <o officedocumentsettings> <o allowpng></o> </o> </xml><xml> <w worddocument> <w zoom>0</w> <w trackmoves>false</w> <w trackformatting></w> <w punctuationkerning></w> <w drawinggridhorizontalspacing>18 pt</w> <w drawinggridverticalspacing>18 pt</w> <w displayhorizontaldrawinggridevery>0</w> <w displayverticaldrawinggridevery>0</w> <w validateagainstschemas></w> <w saveifxmlinvalid>false</w> <w ignoremixedcontent>false</w> <w alwaysshowplaceholdertext>false</w> <w compatibility> <w breakwrappedtables></w> <w dontgrowautofit></w> <w dontautofitconstrainedtables></w> <w dontvertalignintxbx></w> </w></w> </xml><xml> <w latentstyles deflockedstate="false" latentstylecount="276"> </w> </xml> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} </style> <xml> <o documentproperties> <o template>Normal.dotm</o> <o revision>0</o> <o totaltime>0</o> <o pages>1</o> <o words>6</o> <o characters>37</o> <o company>Desert Dog Technology, Inc.</o> <o lines>1</o> <o paragraphs>1</o> <o characterswithspaces>45</o> <o version>12.0</o> </o> <o officedocumentsettings> <o allowpng></o> </o> </xml><xml> <w worddocument> <w zoom>0</w> <w trackmoves>false</w> <w trackformatting></w> <w punctuationkerning></w> <w drawinggridhorizontalspacing>18 pt</w> <w drawinggridverticalspacing>18 pt</w> <w displayhorizontaldrawinggridevery>0</w> <w displayverticaldrawinggridevery>0</w> <w validateagainstschemas></w> <w saveifxmlinvalid>false</w> <w ignoremixedcontent>false</w> <w alwaysshowplaceholdertext>false</w> <w compatibility> <w breakwrappedtables></w> <w dontgrowautofit></w> <w dontautofitconstrainedtables></w> <w dontvertalignintxbx></w> </w></w> </xml><xml> <w latentstyles deflockedstate="false" latentstylecount="276"> </w> </xml> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} </style> <xml> <o documentproperties> <o template>Normal.dotm</o> <o revision>0</o> <o totaltime>0</o> <o pages>1</o> <o words>6</o> <o characters>37</o> <o company>Desert Dog Technology, Inc.</o> <o lines>1</o> <o paragraphs>1</o> <o characterswithspaces>45</o> <o version>12.0</o> </o> <o officedocumentsettings> <o allowpng></o> </o> </xml><xml> <w worddocument> <w zoom>0</w> <w trackmoves>false</w> <w trackformatting></w> <w punctuationkerning></w> <w drawinggridhorizontalspacing>18 pt</w> <w drawinggridverticalspacing>18 pt</w> <w displayhorizontaldrawinggridevery>0</w> <w displayverticaldrawinggridevery>0</w> <w validateagainstschemas></w> <w saveifxmlinvalid>false</w> <w ignoremixedcontent>false</w> <w alwaysshowplaceholdertext>false</w> <w compatibility> <w breakwrappedtables></w> <w dontgrowautofit></w> <w dontautofitconstrainedtables></w> <w dontvertalignintxbx></w> </w></w> </xml><xml> <w latentstyles deflockedstate="false" latentstylecount="276"> </w> </xml> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} </style> More recently: <strong>March 14, 2013</strong> New England Journal of Medicine<br /> <a href="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1209250" fcksavedurl="http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1209250">http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1209250</a> </p><p class="MsoNormal"><o p="">Patients with low back pain were examined before treatment and one year later. Again, the presence of herniated discs did not correlate with pain.&nbsp;</o>&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p="">&nbsp;</o></p> <p class="MsoNormal">There has been no change in the trend of rising cost of treating LBP in Western countries</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Early MRI can lead to worse outcomes:</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://www.bodyinmind.org/spinal-mri-and-back-pain/" fcksavedurl="http://www.bodyinmind.org/spinal-mri-and-back-pain/">Of Shiny Pictures and Poorer Outcomes: Spinal MRI and Back Pain</a></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">One reason may be belief reinforcement, another may be unnecessary surgery:</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3663473/?report=classic" fcksavedurl="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3663473/?report=classic">https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3663473/?report=classic</a></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Learning about pain science can help:</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://www.bboyscience.com/pain-education/" fcksavedurl="http://www.bboyscience.com/pain-education/">Learning Pain Science Can Relieve and Prevent Pain</a></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><em><strong>Lorimer Moseley is a very funny guy and a pain science missionary. Watch his videos. </strong></em>Watch as many as you can! It may be the easiest, fastest, and most fun way to learn about pain science. Here are just a few:</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gwd-wLdIHjs" fcksavedurl="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gwd-wLdIHjs">15 Minute TED Talk: Why things hurt</a></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYoGXv22G3k" fcksavedurl="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYoGXv22G3k">25 Minute talk on pain</a></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3NmTE-fJSo" fcksavedurl="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3NmTE-fJSo">45 Minute lecture: details of how pain works</a></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://www.bodyinmind.org/popping-your-disc-when-elegant-simplifications-are-catastrophic-trivialisations/" fcksavedurl="http://www.bodyinmind.org/popping-your-disc-when-elegant-simplifications-are-catastrophic-trivialisations/">Article with link to&nbsp;video about the &quot;popping spine.&quot;</a></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Includes video on understanding pain (bottom right of page).</p> <p class="MsoNormal">I highly recommend the book&nbsp;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Explain-Pain-David-Butler/dp/097509100X" fcksavedurl="http://www.amazon.com/Explain-Pain-David-Butler/dp/097509100X">Explain Pain</a>&nbsp;by Butler and Moseley. It is thorough and detailed yet easy to understand and includes suggestions for self-help, such as <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/using-graded-exposure-manage-chronic-pain" fcksavedurl="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/using-graded-exposure-manage-chronic-pain">graded exposure </a>movements. This book is a must-read for anyone with chronic pain or anyone who works with chronic pain. If you don't want to pay $75 for it, get your library to get it for you on the interlibrary loan system. Better yet, request your library to get a copy of it into their system.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">I recently started the <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/herniated-discs-mris-and-low-back-pain" fcksavedurl="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/herniated-discs-mris-and-low-back-pain">first in a series of articles on pain science.</a> It looks at herniated discs, MRIs, and back pain. I'll be following this out more in future articles. Stay tuned!</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p="">For those of you who like to read geeky academic papers and seriously get into the details of current pain science, I suggest the following:</o></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p="">Current thinking on pain as a bio/psycho/social phenomenon:</o></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p=""><a href="http://www.360nmt.com/pdfs/pain_and_the_neuromatrix_in_the_brain.pdf" fcksavedurl="http://www.360nmt.com/pdfs/pain_and_the_neuromatrix_in_the_brain.pdf">Pain and the Neuromatrix in the Brain</a></o></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p="">An examination of the lack of correlation between posture, structure, and pain:</o></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p=""><a href="http://www.sigurdmikkelsen.no/admin/dokumenter/JBMT%20debate%20-%202011%20-%20Is%20a%20postural-structural-biomechanical%20model,%20within%20manual%20therapies,%20viable%3F.pdf" fcksavedurl="http://www.sigurdmikkelsen.no/admin/dokumenter/JBMT%20debate%20-%202011%20-%20Is%20a%20postural-structural-biomechanical%20model,%20within%20manual%20therapies,%20viable%3F.pdf">The fall of the postural-structural-biomechanical model in manual and physical therapies: Exemplified by lower back pain</a></o></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p=""></o></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p="">An overview of recommendations for the treatment of low back pain in European countries:<br /> </o></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p=""><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2997201/?report=classic" fcksavedurl="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2997201/?report=classic">An updated view of clinical guidelines for the management of low back pain in primary care.</a><br /> <br /> </o></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Recommendations by the American College of Physicians for the use of diagnostic imaging:</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleID=746774&amp;atab=7" fcksavedurl="http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleID=746774&amp;atab=7">Diagnostic Imaging for Low Back Pain: Advice for High Value Health-Care from the American College of Physicians</a></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p="">Melzack &amp; Katz' paper on Pain. A thorough examination of the history of pain science - where we have come from, where we are today. Not easy reading but there's some really good stuff here!</o></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p=""><a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/wcs.1201/full" fcksavedurl="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/wcs.1201/full">Pain&nbsp;</a></o>&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <h4><em>Thanks to the Skeptical Society for allowing me the opportunity to share information on current pain science and low back pain!</em></h4> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p="">&nbsp;</o></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><o p="">&nbsp;</o></p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p>--&gt;</p> --></p></div> <section class="comments" > </section> Thu, 12 Sep 2013 19:01:01 +0000 Alice 218 at http://www.massage-stlouis.com Book Review: Explain Pain by David Butler and Lorimer Moseley http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/book-review-explain-pain-david-butler-and-lorimer-moseley <span>Book Review: Explain Pain by David Butler and Lorimer Moseley</span> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden clearfix"> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/category/tags/videos" hreflang="en">Videos</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/self-help" hreflang="en">Self-Help</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/reviews" hreflang="en">Reviews</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/research" hreflang="en">Research</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/pain-relief" hreflang="en">Pain relief</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/pain-management" hreflang="en">Pain Management</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/neuroscience" hreflang="en">Neuroscience</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/neck-pain" hreflang="en">Neck Pain</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/muscle-strain" hreflang="en">Muscle strain</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/most-popular" hreflang="en">Most Popular</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/injury-rehabilitation" hreflang="en">Injury Rehabilitation</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/back-pain" hreflang="en">Back pain</a></li> </ul> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/alice" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alice</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/07/2013 - 1:58am</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>If I could make only one recommendation to individuals living with chronic pain, it would be to read the book <strong><em><a href="http://www.noigroup.com/en/Product/EPBE">Explain Pain</a></em></strong> by David Butler and Lorimer Moseley.</p> <p>Directed at both clinicians who work with chronic pain patients and patients who live with chronic pain, <em>Explain Pain</em> shows how the discoveries of modern pain science can be put to practical use. Written in understandable language with a touch of lighthearted humor, Butler and Moseley take a complex subject and make it possible for the average person to understand and use. One client remarked that she thought it would be hard to read and was delighted that she did not find it difficult at all. </p> <h3>Pain education can help</h3> <p>Research has demonstrated that pain education can help to reduce chronic pain. For instance, <a href="http://news.ufl.edu/2012/01/05/back-pain-in-soldiers/">a recent study by the army</a> followed 4,325 soldiers over a two year period and found that one session of pain education could help lower the incidence of low back pain. Understanding how pain works is not a magic bullet that will make pain go away immediately, but it can help to take some of the fear and anxiety out of the experience which can then begin to help alter the experience. With time, thinking a little differently about pain can lead to more successful strategies for reducing, limiting, and eliminating pain.  </p> <p><strong>Pain is useful and should not be ignored.</strong> Pain is a <em>protective mechanism</em> generated by the brain in response to <em>perceived threat.</em> However, when pain is chronic and there is no direct or immediate threat to the body, understanding how the body can get "stuck" in pain can suggest ways to help it get "unstuck." </p> <p>Butler and Moseley provide some amazing stories to illustrate the surprising discovery that pain is not directly related to tissue damage. While this concept may, at first, seem odd and difficult to grasp, they produce convincing evidence to support this idea. Consider this: a paper cut produces very little tissue damage, yet can cause a lot of pain. A soldier can get shot in battle, yet not realize he is injured until he is off the battlefield. Amputees may experience phantom limb pain in tissue that no longer exists. How does that happen? The part of the brain that corresponded to the amputated limb can still generate the sensation of pain, even after the limb is gone. </p> <p>Pain can be influenced by <em>context.</em> If everyone around us seems to be in pain, we may also expect to be in pain. Athletes involved in vigorous sports ignore impacts that would upset most of us because to them it's all part of the game. In that context, it is expected and not a threat. </p> <p>Butler and Moseley describe how pain is generated by the nervous system. Understanding that pain is generated by the brain, rather than by damaged tissues, does <em>not</em> mean that pain is "all in your head" and should be ignored or dismissed as imaginary. In fact, understanding that pain is the body's alarm system highlights the importance of treating pain so that the alarm system does not become oversensitive. </p> <p>The book describes what happens in different systems of the body and how they may be affected by pain. Normal responses to painful stimuli are contrasted with what happens when the responses become altered. The influence of our thoughts and beliefs is examined for the role it can play in chronic pain.</p> <h3>Practical suggestions</h3> <p>The last few chapters of <em>Explain Pain</em> suggest practical tools that can be used to manage chronic pain. Using "the virtual body" is explained, as is the use of <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/using-graded-exposure-manage-chronic-pain">graded exposure</a> to break the association between particular movements and pain and to cultivate successful movement without pain. </p> <p><em><strong>Pain education should be part of every client or patient's rehabilitation.</strong></em> <em>Explain Pain</em> provides an excellent model for pain education.</p> <p>One of my clients suffered for many years with a painful chronic condition and found this book immensely helpful. Although she had seen many doctors and therapists, she had never been given any pain education. After reading this book, she asked, "Why didn't anyone tell me this?" My response was, "They didn't know." Although <em>Explain Pain</em> was first published in 2003, pain science is still only slowly finding its way to practitioners. </p> <p>Since I've begun studying pain science, I've incorporated information the information presented in <em>Explain Pain </em>into my practice. It has been a useful tool for helping clients get out of pain and feel in control of their lives once again.</p> <h3>Additional resources</h3> <p>I've posted a fifteen minute TED Talk by Lorimer Moseley on Why Pain Hurts <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/why-pain-hurts-lorimer-moseley-explains">in a previous post.</a> There is also, in the same article, a forty-five minute lecture to a professional audience for those geeky folks who want to understand details about the biology of pain. Recently, I've found a <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYoGXv22G3k">twenty-five minute video by Moseley</a> which has become a favorite because he addresses how we think about conditions like herniated discs and how our thinking can feed and perpetuate fear, anxiety, and pain. <em>If you watch only one of these videos, this is the one I recommend.</em> These videos are educational and entertaining. Moseley, who is both researcher and clinician, has a charming Australian accent and a great sense of humor. Imagine Crocodile Dundee giving an introduction to pain science and you'll get the picture.</p> <p>For more information about understanding pain, I also suggest the following: </p> <p>Painful Yarns by Lorimer Moseley (stories to help understand the biology of pain)</p> <p>Also, check out this <a href="http://saveyourself.ca/articles/pain-is-an-opinion.php">article about understanding how pain works</a> by Paul Ingraham of SaveYourself.ca. </p> <p>Cory Blickenstaff, PT, has put together some useful videos of "novel movements." Here are links to the ones on the <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/self-help-movements-low-back-pain">low back,</a> <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/self-help-neck-through-novel-movements">neck,</a> and <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/novel-movements-hand-wrist-elbow-forearm">hand, wrist, forearm, and elbow.</a> </p> <p>Remember, you are always welcome to come in for massage therapy, too. Gentle manual therapy can help soothe the body and give the brain something pleasant on which to focus. Most clients find at least some temporary relief, which can help break the cycle of chronic pain. By interrupting pain, we can try to help your body remember what it is like to move without pain. We are committed to providing you the best in hands-on therapy and education to help you get out of and stay out of pain.</p> <p>If you thought this article was useful, please share it with others you think might find it useful, too. <em>Thanks!</em></p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p></div> <section class="comments" > </section> Tue, 07 May 2013 05:58:47 +0000 Alice 203 at http://www.massage-stlouis.com Self-Help Movements for Low Back Pain http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/self-help-movements-low-back-pain <span>Self-Help Movements for Low Back Pain</span> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden clearfix"> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/category/tags/self-help" hreflang="en">Self-Help</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/pain-relief" hreflang="en">Pain relief</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/pain-management" hreflang="en">Pain Management</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/most-popular" hreflang="en">Most Popular</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/injury-rehabilitation" hreflang="en">Injury Rehabilitation</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/exercise" hreflang="en">Exercise</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/back-pain" hreflang="en">Back pain</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/videos" hreflang="en">Videos</a></li> </ul> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/alice" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alice</span></span> <span>Mon, 08/20/2012 - 9:01pm</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Low back pain is one of the most common and persistent pain problems, affecting millions of people. Besides working hands-on with clients, I try to help them understand how pain works and to find ways they can continue to help themselves at home.<br /><br /> Cory Blickenstaff is a physical therapist in Vancouver, WA. My clients have found his videos on "edgework" and "novel movements" to be helpful and enjoyable. <br /><br /> "Edgework" is finding the point in a movement where it begins to transition from easy and comfortable to slightly guarded or painful. Movements should be done slowly, watching carefully for the first sign of holding the breath, muscular tension, or pain. The movement presented in the video is one possible movement. Other movements can be used as "edgework" using the same approach.<br /><br /> "Novel movements" are movements that are a little different from the way we normally move. As Cory says, they are movements about which the brain has not yet formed an opinion. By practicing novel movements, we can try to find movements that are not painful and break the association between movement and pain.<br /><br /> As always, do these movements only to your comfort level and if they seem to aggravate your condition, stop immediately.<br /><br /> If you'd like to see some of Cory's other videos, check out the <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/self-help-neck-through-novel-movements">Novel Movements for the Neck </a>or <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/self-help-neck-through-novel-movements">Novel Movements for the Hand, Wrist, Elbow, and Forearm.</a> You can also find more of Cory's other videos on YouTube by clicking on the "YouTube" box at the bottom right of the video.<br /><br /> Let me know how these movements work for you!<br /><br /><br /><iframe width="471" height="269" frameborder="0" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/cvipUUKPPPc" allowfullscreen=""></iframe> <br /><br /><iframe width="471" height="269" frameborder="0" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Jn-3eU54vuA" allowfullscreen=""></iframe> <br /><br /><iframe width="471" height="269" frameborder="0" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/8d9R3ma3D1M" allowfullscreen=""></iframe> </p> <p> </p></div> <section class="comments" > <a id="comment-167"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" class="js-comment comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1362631291"></mark> <footer class="attribution"> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/us3r/0"> </article> <div class="comment-submitted"> <p class="commenter-name"> <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.relaxathome.com.au/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jean @ RelaxAtHome (not verified)</a> </p> <p class="comment-time"> Wed, 03/06/2013 - 11:41pm </p> <p class="comment-permalink"> <a href="/comment/167#comment-167" hreflang="en">Permalink</a> </p> </div> </footer> <div class="comment-text"> <div class="comment-arrow"></div> <h3><a href="/comment/167#comment-167" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">A good and simple routines to</a></h3> <div class="content"> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>A good and simple routines to try at home. Good for those that come from work and have a lot of stress which causes back pain.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=167&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="5EsOUo5fz0dhfO2bRk_l-ywwj6OH5l8p9nz86QNDu_A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </div> </article> <div class="indented"><a id="comment-172"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="6" class="js-comment comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1364353531"></mark> <footer class="attribution"> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/users/alice"> </article> <div class="comment-submitted"> <p class="commenter-name"> <span lang="" about="/users/alice" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alice</span> </p> <p class="comment-time"> Tue, 03/26/2013 - 11:05pm </p> <p class="comment-permalink"> <a href="/comment/172#comment-172" hreflang="en">Permalink</a> </p> </div> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/167#comment-167" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">A good and simple routines to</a> by <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.relaxathome.com.au/" lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jean @ RelaxAtHome (not verified)</a></p> </footer> <div class="comment-text"> <div class="comment-arrow"></div> <h3><a href="/comment/172#comment-172" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en"> I&#039;m glad you liked it. We&#039;ve</a></h3> <div class="content"> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p> I'm glad you liked it. We've also got a few other of Cory's videos. Look in the search box to the right for "Novel movements." Currently we've also got ones for the neck and for the hand, wrist, forearm, and elbow. We may put up more in the future. You can find his other videos by clicking on the YouTube icon at the bottom of the screen. </p></div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=172&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="l2y0MFRG7J-nLA53-JUqY3qiMA73rZByOLFeraPySeo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </div> </article> </div> </section> Tue, 21 Aug 2012 01:01:46 +0000 Alice 178 at http://www.massage-stlouis.com Professor Moyer Discusses Reiki Research http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/professor-moyer-discusses-reiki-research <span>Professor Moyer Discusses Reiki Research</span> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden clearfix"> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/category/tags/videos" hreflang="en">Videos</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/research" hreflang="en">Research</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/evidence-based-massage" hreflang="en">Evidence Based Massage</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/energy-work" hreflang="en">Energy Work</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/most-popular" hreflang="en">Most Popular</a></li> </ul> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/alice" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alice</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/17/2012 - 7:22pm</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p><a href="http://psychradio.org/About_Dr_Moyer">Christopher Moyer, Ph.D</a>., is a professor of psychology who has done research on anxiety, depression, and massage therapy. He recently co-authored the book <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/massage-therapy-integrating-research-and-practice-edited-dryden-moyer-review"><span>Massage Therapy: Integrating Research and Practice</span>.</a> Active in many online discussions, Moyer has been a voice for science literacy and research literacy in the field of massage therapy. Through his online comments, he has patiently and generously mentored many massage therapists who aspire to be more science-based and research literate. In a recent FaceBook discussion, Moyer raised the question: why is continuing education credit, required for some professional memberships and state licensing, granted for classes in Reiki?</p> <!--break--> <p><br /><br /> For those who may not be familiar with the term, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reiki">Reiki</a> is a type of "energy work" in which practitioners place their hands either on or above the body of the recipient in the belief that they are transmitting "universal energy" to the recipient and somehow effecting healing. There is no <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reiki#Scientific_research">scientific evidence</a> to support either the existence of this universal energy or the efficacy of Reiki to promote healing beyond a placebo effect.<br /><br /> During the online discussion, one massage therapist asked Moyer how he could say that Reiki does not work when there is research that supposes to support the efficacy of Reiki treatments. In this seventeen minute video, Moyer answers the question in detail. He examines the difference between a valid study and a poorly designed study and the quality of most Reiki "research." In particular, he looks at one study that was published in a respectable journal and explains exactly why the study does not demonstrate the efficacy of Reiki but, in fact, merely reinforces what we already know: human beings respond to caring and compassionate touch and focused attention. One does not need to add an unproved and implausible "energy field" to explain a positive response to a Reiki treatment.<br /><br /> Moyer explains his points about research and about Reiki carefully and clearly. I recommend this video to all massage therapists. It may also be of interest to anyone wishing to better understand the difference between well-designed research and poorly designed research, "energy work" in general, and Reiki in particular.<br /><br />  </p> <p><br /><iframe width="471" height="269" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/bgkJhFlfO60"></iframe></p> <p> </p></div> <section class="comments" > <a id="comment-236"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" class="js-comment comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1377837389"></mark> <footer class="attribution"> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/us3r/0"> </article> <div class="comment-submitted"> <p class="commenter-name"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Guest (not verified)</span> </p> <p class="comment-time"> Fri, 08/30/2013 - 12:36am </p> <p class="comment-permalink"> <a href="/comment/236#comment-236" hreflang="en">Permalink</a> </p> </div> </footer> <div class="comment-text"> <div class="comment-arrow"></div> <h3><a href="/comment/236#comment-236" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Reiki</a></h3> <div class="content"> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>To my understanding Reiki is not the same as the blanket term "Energy Work". Reiki, in my thought, as I studied it, is about drawing on the universal energy and offering it to another person. It is not about changing or manipulating another person's energy... but rather offering the universal energy to their body for it to use as is needed. Reiki is not Chakra based - that is, to my understanding, "Energy Work" - and yes, I believe that "energy work" does claim what you are discussing, to alter another person's energy field. </p> <p>I appreciate your breakdown of the one research article. It was nice to hear your thoughts.</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=236&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="63Ek06kv-8oPnFUQouYFUi6GBo-N8o4B3vfGbD9FsNo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </div> </article> <div class="indented"><a id="comment-241"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="6" class="js-comment comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1379008263"></mark> <footer class="attribution"> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/users/alice"> </article> <div class="comment-submitted"> <p class="commenter-name"> <span lang="" about="/users/alice" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alice</span> </p> <p class="comment-time"> Thu, 09/12/2013 - 1:51pm </p> <p class="comment-permalink"> <a href="/comment/241#comment-241" hreflang="en">Permalink</a> </p> </div> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/236#comment-236" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Reiki</a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Guest (not verified)</span></p> </footer> <div class="comment-text"> <div class="comment-arrow"></div> <h3><a href="/comment/241#comment-241" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en"> Reiki is a type of energy</a></h3> <div class="content"> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p> Reiki is a type of energy work.</p> <p>The term "energy work" can encompass a variety of modalities that claim to someone manipulate some sort of human energy field. I've written my thoughts about that <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/what-energy-work-some-thoughts-evidence-based-therapist">here.</a></p> <p>Thanks for stopping by!</p></div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=241&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="hPLatxjPM67VaaFirov5UOe1LVMnD2o02gvTOgosHG0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </div> </article> </div> </section> Fri, 17 Aug 2012 23:22:42 +0000 Alice 177 at http://www.massage-stlouis.com http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/professor-moyer-discusses-reiki-research#comments Why Pain Hurts: Lorimer Moseley Explains http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/why-pain-hurts-lorimer-moseley-explains <span>Why Pain Hurts: Lorimer Moseley Explains</span> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden clearfix"> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/category/tags/self-help" hreflang="en">Self-Help</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/research" hreflang="en">Research</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/pain-relief" hreflang="en">Pain relief</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/pain-management" hreflang="en">Pain Management</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/neuroscience" hreflang="en">Neuroscience</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/neck-pain" hreflang="en">Neck Pain</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/injury-rehabilitation" hreflang="en">Injury Rehabilitation</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/most-popular" hreflang="en">Most Popular</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/evidence-based-massage" hreflang="en">Evidence Based Massage</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/back-pain" hreflang="en">Back pain</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/videos" hreflang="en">Videos</a></li> </ul> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/alice" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alice</span></span> <span>Tue, 11/29/2011 - 4:53pm</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>I've been learning a lot about the role of the brain and the central nervous system in our experience of pain. One of the people who studies this and writes about it is Lorimer Moseley, co-author of Explain Pain. His TED Talk explains, in 15 minutes, some important discoveries in pain research.</p> <p><iframe width="471" height="269" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/gwd-wLdIHjs"></iframe></p> <p> </p> <p>As Moseley explains, pain is a sensation created by the brain to protect us. If the brain <em>perceives</em> threat, it may create pain when there is, in fact, no threat. Conversely, there may be great threat but if the brain does not perceive this, we may feel little or no pain.<br /><br /> For those who would like to understand how pain works in greater detail, the following video of a 45 minute lecture will explain more about the neurobiology of pain. Of particular note is his description of "central sensitization" beginning at about the 35 minute mark. What pain research scientists have learned is that the more the nervous system is subjected to pain, the more sensitized it becomes and the less stimulus it requires to feel pain. This underlines the importance of treating pain promptly rather than waiting, often for years, to treat it. It also illustrates why therapy for pain should not be painful. "No pain, no gain," is not a good motto when it comes to treating pain!<br /><br /> I hope you find these videos interesting and informative. Understanding how pain works may not immediately stop the hurt, but it can help to change the experience and start us down the path of reducing or eliminating pain.</p> <p> </p> <p><iframe width="471" height="269" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/-3NmTE-fJSo"></iframe></p></div> <section class="comments" > </section> Tue, 29 Nov 2011 21:53:16 +0000 Alice 159 at http://www.massage-stlouis.com http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/why-pain-hurts-lorimer-moseley-explains#comments Basic Russian Massage Strokes: Circular Heel of the Hand Friction http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/basic-russian-massage-strokes-circular-heel-hand-friction <span>Basic Russian Massage Strokes: Circular Heel of the Hand Friction</span> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden clearfix"> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/category/tags/videos" hreflang="en">Videos</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/russian-massage" hreflang="en">Russian Massage</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/most-popular" hreflang="en">Most Popular</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/massage-therapy" hreflang="en">Massage Therapy</a></li> </ul> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/alice" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alice</span></span> <span>Mon, 11/28/2011 - 5:24pm</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>If I could teach only one stroke to other massage therapists, it would be Russian circular heel of the hand friction. <br /><br /> Friction is seldom used in Swedish massage but used quite a bit in Russian massage. It's a great stroke and I consider it my "workhorse." I incorporate it liberally during full-body relaxation massage because it's relaxing and feels very good. It's great for muscles that are tight and sore. It's particularly useful with athletes. It's my favorite stroke.<br /><br /> Done properly, it's very comfortable for the client and very easy on the therapist. Remember not to do it too fast. It should be done at a moderate to slow pace. Too fast will take the sensation of depth out of it. Oil should be minimum, just enough to let you move along easily but not so much that you are sliding over the skin. There should still be a little friction.</p> <p><iframe width="471" height="269" frameborder="0" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/NbA0T-UNW30?rel=0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>Will Stewart of 3-D Optimal Performance and I teamed up to produce this brief demonstration of Russian circular heel of the hand friction. Try it and tell me how you and your clients like it!</p></div> <section class="comments" > </section> Mon, 28 Nov 2011 22:24:40 +0000 Alice 158 at http://www.massage-stlouis.com http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/basic-russian-massage-strokes-circular-heel-hand-friction#comments Russian Massage Basic Stroke: Continuous Flat Effleurage http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/russian-massage-basic-stroke-continuous-flat-effleurage <span>Russian Massage Basic Stroke: Continuous Flat Effleurage</span> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden clearfix"> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/category/tags/videos" hreflang="en">Videos</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/russian-massage" hreflang="en">Russian Massage</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/relaxation" hreflang="en">Relaxation</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/massage" hreflang="en">Massage</a></li> </ul> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/alice" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alice</span></span> <span>Mon, 11/14/2011 - 9:50am</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>This is the second in a series of brief videos introducing the principles and practice of Russian Medical and Sports Massage. <br /><br /> Our first video gave a brief <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/introduction-principles-russian-massage">Introduction to the Principles of Russian Massage.</a> The second video, presented here, gives a brief demonstration of flat continuous effleurage on the back.</p> <p>Continuous flat effleurage is very calming to the central nervous system and a good beginning and ending stroke. In Russian Massage, we are very specific about how the strokes are done. How the hand is held, how the fingers are placed, all enhance the stroke and make a small but significant difference. The continuous movement in one direction produces a unique feeling that is a little different from common Swedish effleurage. Since the hands are working alternately, each hand has a moment of rest between strokes. These brief periods of rest make the stroke less fatiguing for the therapist than in traditional Swedish massage, where both hands are always working at the same time.<br /><br /> Try it and let us know what you think.</p> <p> </p> <p><iframe width="471" height="269" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/o9WMrGltPts"></iframe></p> <p> </p> <p>Thanks to <a href="http://3doptimalperformance.blogspot.com/">Will Stewart of 3-D Optimal Performance</a> for making this video possible.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p></div> <section class="comments" > </section> Mon, 14 Nov 2011 14:50:52 +0000 Alice 156 at http://www.massage-stlouis.com Introduction to the Principles of Russian Massage http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/introduction-principles-russian-massage <span>Introduction to the Principles of Russian Massage</span> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden clearfix"> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/category/tags/videos" hreflang="en">Videos</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/russian-massage" hreflang="en">Russian Massage</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/neuroscience" hreflang="en">Neuroscience</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/massage-therapy" hreflang="en">Massage Therapy</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/evidence-based-massage" hreflang="en">Evidence Based Massage</a></li> </ul> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/alice" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alice</span></span> <span>Mon, 11/14/2011 - 12:35am</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>I'm excited to announce the first of a series of brief videos that will introduce the principles and practice of Russian massage.<br /><br /> Russian Massage is a medical and sports massage developed in the former Soviet Union and used in hospitals and clinics there. Based on research, Russian Massage works with the physiological processes of the body to promote desired change and recognizes the role of the central nervous system in bringing about that change.<br /><br /> This first video gives a brief introduction to the history and principles of Russian Massage and discusses how the practice of Russian Massage agrees with current understanding of neuroscience.</p> <p>Special thanks to <a href="http://3doptimalperformance.blogspot.com/">Will Stewart of 3-D Optimal Performance</a> for making these videos possible.</p> <p>I hope you like it. Let me know what you think!</p> <p> </p> <p><iframe width="471" height="269" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/zBHsZPQsF70"></iframe></p></div> <section class="comments" > </section> Mon, 14 Nov 2011 05:35:15 +0000 Alice 155 at http://www.massage-stlouis.com http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/introduction-principles-russian-massage#comments Self-Help for the Neck Through Novel Movements http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/self-help-neck-through-novel-movements <span>Self-Help for the Neck Through Novel Movements</span> <div class="field field--name-field-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden clearfix"> <ul class="links field__items"> <li><a href="/category/tags/self-help" hreflang="en">Self-Help</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/pain-relief" hreflang="en">Pain relief</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/pain-management" hreflang="en">Pain Management</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/neck-pain" hreflang="en">Neck Pain</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/injury-rehabilitation" hreflang="en">Injury Rehabilitation</a></li> <li><a href="/category/tags/videos" hreflang="en">Videos</a></li> </ul> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/users/alice" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alice</span></span> <span>Thu, 09/08/2011 - 1:10am</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>While low back pain may be one of the most common complaints seen by doctors, neck and upper back/shoulder pain is the most common complaint seen in my office. So many people spend their days sitting in front of a computer, head forward and motionless for hours at a time, it seems inevitable that eventually the neck and upper back are going to begin to  protest. I encourage clients to get up and move as often as possible and especially to move in directions that are different from or opposite to the direction in which they've held themselves for extended periods. The body wants to move and likes variety of movement.<br /><br /><a href="http://www.forwardmotionpt.com/index.html">Cory Blickenstaff, P.T.,</a> is a physical therapist in Vancouver, WA. He has a particular interest in incorporating understanding how the nervous system operates into physical therapy. I recently posted his video of <a href="http://www.massage-stlouis.com/novel-movements-hand-wrist-elbow-forearm">Novel Movements for the Hand, Wrist, and Elbow</a> and it's been very popular with clients. In these two videos, Cory demonstrates <strong>Novel Movements for the Neck.</strong> My clients who have tried them have liked them a lot.</p> <p> </p> <p><iframe width="420" height="345" frameborder="0" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/hm0MY9jt9rk?rel=0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>  </p> <p><iframe width="420" height="345" frameborder="0" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/L1btmf8LsDM?rel=0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p> </p> <p> Cory notes:</p> <div id="watch-description-text"><blockquote> <p id="eow-description">There is no need to push these movements or for them to be uncomfortable at any time. Please keep this in mind if you try them yourself. . . I frequently use these in clinic for people with neck pain, headaches, radiating arm pain as well as for "warm up" and micro breaking movements for people exposed to a lot of sitting.</p> </blockquote> <p>For more information on the concept of novelty in movement, visit Cory's blog at <a class="yt-uix-redirect-link" dir="ltr" rel="nofollow" title="http://blog.forwardmotionpt.com" target="_blank" href="http://blog.forwardmotionpt.com/">http://blog.forwardmotionpt.com</a></p> <p>Massage can help to reduce the feeling stiffness and soreness in the neck and practicing these <strong>Novel Movements for the Neck</strong> can help you continue feeling good after your massage.</p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <p> </p> </div></div> <section class="comments" > <a id="comment-106"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" class="js-comment comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1337747112"></mark> <footer class="attribution"> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/us3r/0"> </article> <div class="comment-submitted"> <p class="commenter-name"> <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jennifer (not verified)</span> </p> <p class="comment-time"> Wed, 05/23/2012 - 12:25am </p> <p class="comment-permalink"> <a href="/comment/106#comment-106" hreflang="en">Permalink</a> </p> </div> </footer> <div class="comment-text"> <div class="comment-arrow"></div> <h3><a href="/comment/106#comment-106" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">novel neck movement videos</a></h3> <div class="content"> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Excellent! Thanks for sharing, Alice. I just tried these movements while sitting at the computer and I love the immediate results!</p> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=106&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="XMZCqI1e2uxFzIBNe34ps97hw_BEkZdD2ziihGJFPcE"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </div> </article> <div class="indented"><a id="comment-107"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="6" class="js-comment comment"> <mark class="hidden" data-comment-timestamp="1337747534"></mark> <footer class="attribution"> <article typeof="schema:Person" about="/users/alice"> </article> <div class="comment-submitted"> <p class="commenter-name"> <span lang="" about="/users/alice" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Alice</span> </p> <p class="comment-time"> Wed, 05/23/2012 - 12:32am </p> <p class="comment-permalink"> <a href="/comment/107#comment-107" hreflang="en">Permalink</a> </p> </div> <p class="visually-hidden">In reply to <a href="/comment/106#comment-106" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">novel neck movement videos</a> by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Jennifer (not verified)</span></p> </footer> <div class="comment-text"> <div class="comment-arrow"></div> <h3><a href="/comment/107#comment-107" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">I&#039;m glad you liked them,</a></h3> <div class="content"> <div class="field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>I'm glad you liked them, Jennifer. Thanks for letting me know!</p></div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=107&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="pc58SuPlL1cyFmEt5f6veN6PvB2IkTk_FO1GhL2Yo3Y"></drupal-render-placeholder> </div> </div> </article> </div> </section> Thu, 08 Sep 2011 05:10:12 +0000 Alice 152 at http://www.massage-stlouis.com http://www.massage-stlouis.com/blog/self-help-neck-through-novel-movements#comments